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During the three to five years that it takes for a girl to get through puberty, there’s a LOT of stuff going on! Some of the changes can be exciting, but many create anxiety. Girls worry about whether their body is changing in a normal way. They worry if they are first to develop, and they really worry if they are developing later than all of their friends. And when bodies are changing and doing new things that they don’t understand, they worry that something is wrong.

When girls understand what’s normal and expected, they face the changes with greater confidence and less anxiety. After a decade of leading girls’ puberty eduction programs and receiving thousands of questions through our website, we know what girls (and their...

Girlology is thrilled to be a small part of a huge project that is improving the way kids learn about sex and sexuality. Amaze.org has created animated videos (fun, accurate, humorous, goofy...just the way we like them!) that give kids all the answers they actually want to know about sex, their body and relationships. This video on menstruation was developed from our You Got IT ebook, and our Co-Founder, Dr. Holmes, serves as an Advisory Panel member providing feedback and input on all of the videos. 

Check out their website (amaze.org) and YouTube channel (Amaze Org)  to see thier other videos and share them with your children. On the amaze.org website,...

When girls and women talk about cramps, they are usually referring to menstrual cramps, not just a leg cramp (although girls have plenty of those, too!). Cramps happen because the uterus, which is made of muscle, squeezes to release the endometrial lining that makes up a period. As the uterus squeezes, it can cramp, just like any muscle that works hard.

The most effective treatments for cramps are 

  1. EXERCISE. Taking a brisk walk or a slow jog are a great way to reduce menstrual cramps. We’ve heard from many girls that when they are involved in daily sports practice, they don’t have very much pain with their period, but when they are off season and less active, their cramps are worse. Scientific...

As we teach children about their changing bodies, we can’t forget to teach them about what’s happening to the opposite gender. Whether or not your boy is anywhere close to puberty himself, the girls are changing as early as 2nd grade. Giving him a basic understanding goes a long way to help him feel informed, decrease anxiety about what’s ahead, AND improve his support for peers who may be blooming early.

Here’s our list of things a boy needs to know as he faces puberty blossoming among the girls. Let us know what you would add!

  • Girls go First. Let him know that girls’ bodies usually start to change before boys’ do, sometimes as early as 2nd grade. Since the first outward sign of puberty for most...

“If you’re like most girls, there was no warning or announcement. It just showed up. Maybe you were totally surprised, and maybe you’d been waiting for it — like, forever.” 

Our newest book, You Got IT: Everything You Need to Know When You Start Your Period by Drs. Holmes & Hutchison, provides all sorts of knowledge as well as tips and tricks for managing your monthly. But in addition to knowing the facts, girls also want to know how it happened for other girls and women. What's your period story? Where were you? How did you manage? Were you surprised? Scared? Everyone seems to have some memories about their first period. Your story might be just the one that helps another girl feel more normal or...

As we lead Girlology programs, one of our hopes is that our “grads” will use what they learn in helpful ways. And we love hearing stories of how that’s happening. The note below came via email last week from a mom in Charlotte, NC. 

This is why we really love what we do!

 

Hi, there.  My daughter Lucy* and I attended your Girlology class May of 2010.  A month later she went to Girl Scout Camp for a week.  During camp one of her 10 year old friends started her period.  Lucy was equipped with the tools she needed to provide comfort to her friend and to remain calm during a traumatic time for her friend.  I really believe that your program enabled her to be a calm force and do the right thing to help her friend. ...

Last week, we received several questions about irregular periods:

  • Isn't it normal for the first year of periods to be irregular?
  • My daughter got her first period at 12, then didn't get another period for 4 months.  Is that ok?
  • My daughter’s periods are completely unpredictable.  When should I worry?

 

Irregular periods may seem like the norm for young girls, but there’s a predictable pattern that the vast majority of girls will follow during the first few years of periods. By keeping track of her periods on a calendar, you and your daughter will be able to recognize what’s normal and what’s not.

To calculate cycle length (which is important) remember to count the number of days...

This blog comes from one of the most commonly asked questions from our programs for high school girls. 

A missed period can have very serious implications or may be nothing to worry about.  If you’ve had sex, the most serious implication is probably obvious. Skipping a period may be the first sign of pregnancy.

If you’ve had sex and you skip a period, it’s time to get serious about finding out why. 

If you’re pregnant, you’ve got a lot to think about. 

If you’re not pregnant, you’ll understand the fear and worry that is inevitable when you are having sex, even if you are being careful with birth control.  You know that birth control is not 100% effective, so that makes a late period a seriously...